When Pauline Rose Clance and Suzanne Imes first identified the syndrome, they theorized that women were uniquely affected by impostor syndrome. Since then, research has shown that both men and women experience impostor feelings, and Clance published a later paper acknowledging that impostor syndrome is not limited to women. Today, impostor syndrome can apply to anyone “who isn’t able to internalize and own their successes,” says psychologist Audrey Ervin.
“We call our pastors, our elders, and our parishioners who have been silent to speak up and stand up for all who experience abuse,” the #SilenceIsNotSpiritual statement said. “There is no institution with greater capacity to create protected spaces for healing and restoration for survivors, as well as confession, repentance and rehabilitation for perpetrators.”